Tuesday, September 25, 2012

4 Foods for Longevity and Diseases Free Part IV - Soy

Over the years of research, 4 foods appeared mostly in medical studies in preventing and treating diseases, are Green Tea, Grape seed and skin, Turmeric and Soy. All Right Reserved.

IV. Soy
A. Quoted from the world most healthy Foods
Soybean 
Soybean is genus Glycine, the family Fabaceae, one of the legumes that contains twice as much protein per acre as any other major vegetable or grain crop, native to Southeast Asia. Now, it is grown worldwide with suitable climate for commercial profit and a a healthy foods.

Nutritional supplements
1. Carbohydrates
2. Dietary fiber
3. Fat
4. Protein
5. Essential amino acid
6. Vitamin A
7. Vitamin B6
8. Vitamin B12
9. Vitamin C
10. Vitamin K
11. Calcium
12. Iron
13. Magnesium
14. Phosphorus
15. Potassium
16. Sodium
17. Zinc
18. Etc.

Health benefits
A. Health Benefits according to studies
1. Insulin sensitive
Soybean helps to normalize plasma glucose and insulin homeostasis, according to "Increased insulin sensitivity and changes in the expression profile of key insulin regulatory genes and beta cell transcription factors in diabetic KKAy-mice after feeding with a soy bean protein rich diet high in isoflavone content" by Nordentoft I, Jeppesen PB, Hong J, Abudula R, Hermansen K.(a)

2. Cardiovascular diseases
Soy protein reduces reduces the levels of serum lipoprotein, decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triacylglycerol/HDL-C and TC/HDL-Cpostmenopausal women are at risk of cardiovascular disease, according to "Effects of soy bean on serum paraoxonase 1 activity and lipoproteins in hyperlipidemic postmenopausal women" by Shidfar F, Ehramphosh E, Heydari I, Haghighi L, Hosseini S, Shidfar S.(b)

3. Adipogenesis and Adipolysis
Germinated soy bean protein hydrolysates had an effect on inhibition of lipid storage in adypocites and increasing lipolysis, according to "Effect of Germinated Soybean Protein Hydrolysates on Adipogenesis and Adipolysis in 3T3-L1 Cells" by González-Espinosa de Los Monteros LA, Ramón-Gallegos E, Torres-Torres N, Mora-Escobedo R.(c)

4. Antioxidant effects
Extract from Virginia-grown soybean seeds had exerted its antioxidant effect when compared for their total phenolic contents (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(*)) scavenging activities, according to "Comparison of different strategies for soybean antioxidant extraction" by Chung H, Ji X, Canning C, Sun S, Zhou K.(d)

5. Diabetes and hypertension
Soybean
phenolic-rich extracts has exerted the inhibitory activities of phenolic-rich extracts from soybean on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) activities in vitro, according to "Soybean phenolic-rich extracts inhibit key-enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) and hypertension (angiotensin I converting enzyme) in vitro" by Ademiluyi AO, Oboh G.(e)

6. Etc.

B. Health Benefits according to the concentration
1. Molybdenum
Molybdenum cofactor is vital for human enzymes, including xanthine oxidase, sulfite oxidase, and aldehyde oxidase, Deficiency may cause Prenatal brain disruption, according to the study of "Prenatal brain disruption in molybdenum cofactor deficiency" by Carmi-Nawi N, Malinger G, Mandel H, Ichida K, Lerman-Sagie T, Lev D.(1)

2. Tryptophan
Tryptophan beside is the precosur of serotonin as it is famous in inducing sleep if it taken in high dose,according to the study of "Improving the quality of infant sleep through the inclusion at supper of cereals enriched with tryptophan, adenosine-5'-phosphate, and uridine-5'-phosphate" by Cubero J, Chanclón B, Sánchez S, Rivero M, Rodríguez AB, Barriga C.(2), it also enhances the neural responses cayused by depression, according to the study of "The effects of tryptophan depletion on neural responses to emotional words in remitted depression" by Roiser JP, Levy J, Fromm SJ, Nugent AC, Talagala SL, Hasler G, Henn FA, Sahakian BJ, Drevets WC.(3)

3. Mangannese
It is one of important trace in preventing osteroposis, according to the study of "[Study of estrogen deficiency impact on manganese levels in teeth and mandible of rats after ovariectomy]. [Article in Polish]" by Rahnama M, Błoniarz J, Zareba S, Swiatkowski W.(4)and regulating blood sugar level, according to the study of "[An inadequate intake of manganese may favour insulin resistance in girls]. [Article in Spanish]" by Rodríguez-Rodríguez E, Bermejo LM, López-Sobaler AM, Ortega RM.(5)

4. Protein
Protein in Soybean is not only beneficial to the cardiovascular diseases, according to the study of "Soy protein, isoflavones, and cardiovascular health: an American Heart Association Science Advisory for professionals from the Nutrition Committee" by Sacks FM, Lichtenstein A, Van Horn L, Harris W, Kris-Etherton P, Winston M; American Heart Association Nutrition Committee(6), but also plays an important role in treating diabetes, according to "Effects of soy protein and isoflavones on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity: a 6-mo double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in postmenopausal Chinese women with prediabetes or untreated early diabetes" by Liu ZM, Chen YM, Ho SC, Ho YP, Woo J.(7)

5. Etc.

C. Other health benefits
1. Aspartic acid
Aspartic acid not only helps to protect the body from drug toxicity and radiation, it also plays an essential role for the brain in information transmitting across the synapse, thus enhancing the learning and memory mechanism, according to the study of "Disinhibition-Mediated LTP in the Hippocampus is Synapse Specific" by Ormond J, Woodin MA., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21954377

2. Histidine
Histidine plays an important role in promoting white and red blood cells, thus increasing the immune system in fight against forming of free radical and reducing the risk anemia., according to the study of "The role of histidine in the anemia of folate deficiency" by Cooperman JM, Lopez R., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12486209), researchers concluded that concluded that folate deficiency causes histidine depletion through increased urinary excretion of this amino acid. Feeding histidine replenishes tissue levels of histidine, resulting in hemoglobin regeneration. Folic acid administration results in return of histidine to normal urinary levels. Thus, a combination of folic acid histidine would be beneficial for folate deficient individuals.

3. Serine
As an amino acid, serine in soybean not only helps to maintain proper muscle build up by synthesizing fatty acids and proteins, it also is important for brain in to transport information between themselves and cells in other parts of the body, according to the study of "Transport systems of serine at the brain barriers and in brain parenchymal cells" by Kasai Y, Tachikawa M, Hirose S, Akanuma S, Hosoya K., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21592122)

4. Alanine
Alanine not only is essential in production of energy in glucose synthesis (according to the study ofGlucose and insulin effects on the novo amino acid synthesis in young men: studies with stable isotope labeled alanine, glycine, leucine, and lysine" by Robert JJ, Bier DM, Zhao XH, Matthews DE, Young VR., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6815417) it also enhances the immune system in production of anti bodies., according to the study of "The immune response of tetraparental mice to two synthetic amino acid polymers: "high-conjugation" 2,4 dinitrophenyl-glutamic acid57-lysine38-alanine5 (DNP-GLA5) and glutamic acid60 alanine30 tyrosine10 (GAT10)" by Warner CM, Fitzmaurice M, Maurer PH, Merryman CF, Schmerr MJ., posted in The Journey of Immunology (http://www.jimmunol.org/content/111/6/1887)

5. Isoleucine
Another animo acid helps to maintain the body tissues and store glycogen in muscles thereby reducing the risk of muscle breaking down during physical activity., according to the study of "Isoleucine, a potent plasma glucose-lowering amino acid, stimulates glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes" by Doi M, Yamaoka I, Fukunaga T, Nakayama M., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14651987), researchers that isoleucine stimulates the insulin-independent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells, which may contribute to the plasma glucose-lowering effect of isoleucine in normal rats.

6. Etc.

Tofu or bean curd
Tofu or bean curd is soft white blocks made by coagulating soy milk with substance such as salt or acid or enzyne, a stable emulsion of oil, water, and protein that can be made into tofu, originated from Chinese and part of East and Southeast Asian. Since it is proven to be one of many healthy foods, it become synonymous with vegetarianism and others.

Nutritional Supplements
1. Protein
2. Carbohydrate
3. Omega 3 fatty acid
4. Vitamin A
5. B vitamin
6. Magnesium
7. Sodium
8. Manganese
9. Selenium
10. Copper
11. Phosphorus
12. Calcium
13. Potassium
14. Iron
15. Isoflavones
16. Etc.

Health benefits
A. Health benefits according to studies
1. Hair loss
In the orally administered soymetide-4 (MITL), an immunostimulating peptide derived from soybean beta-conglycinin alpha' and it effect on hair loss found that PGE2, which is produced after activation of COX by soymetide-4, might suppress apoptosis of hair matrix cells and etoposide-induced alopecia by activating NF-kappaB, according to "Anti-alopecia mechanisms of soymetide-4, an immunostimulating peptide derived from soy beta-conglycinin" by Tsuruki T, Takahata K, Yoshikawa M.(a)

b.
Metabolic syndrome
In the
assessment of the effect of low daily intake of soybeans in oxidative stress and it effects on the metabolic syndrome (MS) found that Low intake of soy protein for 90 days, besides being well tolerated by the patients, was able to improve several parameters related to the pathophysiology of MS, according to the study of "[Evaluation of the intake of a low daily amount of soybeans in oxidative stress, lipid and inflammatory profile, and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome].[Article in Portuguese] by Bahls LD, Venturini D, Scripes Nde A, Lozovoy MA, Simão TN, Simão AN, Dichi I, Morimoto HK.(b)

3. Cancer prevention
In the evaluation of Soy isoflavones and it effects on cancers found that Soy isoflavones, linked to reduced cancer risk in Asian epidemiology, may suppress cox-2 induction by activating ERbeta. In aggregate, these considerations suggest that a comprehensive lifestyle strategy targeting cox-2 expression and bioactivity may have tremendous potential for cancer prevention, according to "Minimizing the cancer-promotional activity of cox-2 as a central strategy in cancer prevention" by McCarty MF.(c)

4.
Lung cancer
In the Comparison to lung tumor nodules treated with soy isoflavones or radiation, lung tissues from mice found that Soy isoflavones augment destruction of A549 lung tumor nodules by radiation, and also mitigate vascular damage, inflammation and fibrosis caused by radiation injury to normal lung tissue. Soy could be used as a non-toxic complementary approach to improve RT in NSCLC., according to "Soy isoflavones radiosensitize lung cancer while mitigating normal tissue injury" by Hillman GG, Singh-Gupta V, Runyan L, Yunker CK, Rakowski JT, Sarkar FH, Miller S, Gadgeel SM, Sethi S, Joiner MC, Konski AA.(d)

5.
Body weight and glycemic control
In the investigation of
Soy isoflavones and it affects on plasma lipids, body weight, and insulin action, found that glucose tolerance tests in adult females were not significantly different with diet, but offspring eating TAD soy had increased glucose disappearance with overall lower glucose and insulin responses to the glucose challenge compared with typical American diet (TAD) casein, according to "Effects of soy vs. casein protein on body weight and glycemic control in female monkeys and their offspring" by Wagner JD, Jorgensen MJ, Cline JM, Lees CJ, Franke AA, Zhang L, Ayers MR, Schultz C, Kaplan JR.(e)

6. Etc.

B. Health Benefits according to the concentration
1.
Tryptophan
Tryptophan is one of the 10 essential amino acids which the body uses to synthesize the proteins for brain cells need, thus enhancing the nerve cells in information transmitting between themselves and cells in the parts of the body that reduces the risk of anxiety and depression, according to the study of "The effects of tryptophan depletion on neural responses to emotional words in remitted depression" by Roiser JP, Levy J, Fromm SJ, Nugent AC, Talagala SL, Hasler G, Henn FA, Sahakian BJ, Drevets WC.(1)

2. Manganese
It is one of important trace in preventing osteoporosis, according to the study of "[Study of estrogen deficiency impact on manganese levels in teeth and mandible of rats after ovariectomy]. [Article in Polish]" by Rahnama M, Błoniarz J, Zareba S, Swiatkowski W.(1)and regulating blood sugar level, according to the study of "[An inadequate intake of manganese may favour insulin resistance in girls]. [Article in Spanish]" by Rodríguez-Rodríguez E, Bermejo LM, López-Sobaler AM, Ortega RM.(2)

3. Iron
Iron beside is important in enhance the oxygen absorption ti nourish the cells and organs in the body but also form a vital role in the effect of Erythropoietic Stimulating Agents (ESA) hyporesponsiveness, according to "Effects of Iron Supplementation on Erythropoietic Response in Patients with Cancer-Associated Anemia Treated by Means of Erythropoietic Stimulating Agents" by Karlsson T.(3)

4. Protein
In the evaluation of soy protein diet abd it effects on serum creatinine, found that soy feeding was associated with higher renal and hepatic linoleic acid content and higher hepatic alpha-linolenic acid, but lower hepatic arachidonic acid content. and concluded that Isocaloric soy protein feeding ameliorates both epithelial and interstitial changes in the Han:SPRD-cy rat independent of a hypocholesterolemic effect. The histologic benefit is associated with changes in polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism that may influence both inflammatory and proliferative pathways, according to the study of "Modification of polycystic kidney disease and fatty acid status by soy protein diet" by Ogborn MR, Nitschmann E, Weiler HA, Bankovic-Calic N.(4)

C. Others Health benefit
1. Isoflavones
Isoflavones is one of the most powerful phytoestrogen, which not only helps to reduce symptoms of peri-menopause and menopause due to decreasing of the reproduction of estrogen as aging ( in the evaluation of the effect of red clover isoflavone supplementation over vasomotor and overall menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women, posted in PubMed(http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21870906) , researchers found that Red clover isoflavone supplementation was more effective than placebo in reducing daily vasomotor frequency and overall menopausal intensity in postmenopausal women.), it also helps to protect against the development of endometrial carcinoma as well as prolonging the menstrual cycle, ( according to the study of "The effect of phytoestrogens on the female genital tract" by Burton JL, Wells M., posted in PubMed, researchers found that this review will discuss the evidence from both animal studies and humans for an effect of these ubiquitous compounds on the development of the human female genital tract, in addition to prolonging the menstrual cycle, alleviating symptoms of the menopause, and protecting against the development of endometrial carcinoma.

2. Cardiovascular Benefits
Research found that protein of tofu significantly decreases the serum cholesterol by decreasing the levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) but leaving the good cholesterol (HDL) remain the same According to the study of "Effect of soy and milk protein supplementation on serum lipid levels: a randomized controlled trial" by Wofford MR, Rebholz CM, Reynolds K, Chen J, Chen CS, Myers L, Xu J, Jones DW, Whelton PK, He J., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21952693)). It also benefits the cardiovascular health (according to the study of "Soy protein, isoflavones, and cardiovascular health: an American Heart Association Science Advisory for professionals from the Nutrition Committee" by Sacks FM, Lichtenstein A, Van Horn L, Harris W, Kris-Etherton P, Winston M; American Heart Association Nutrition Committee. posted PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16418439)

3. Iron and copper
The ratio of iron and copper is essential to enhance the proper levels of hemoglobin in energy production by transporting and releasing oxygen throughout the body, according to the study of "Influence of copper, iron, zinc and fe (3) (+) haemoglobin levels on the etiopathogenesis of chronic calcific pancreatitis--a study in patients with pancreatitis" by Arumugam G, Padmanaban M, Krishnan D, Panneerselvam S, Rajagopal S., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20809271, researchers found that the results of the present study revealed that the levels of copper and iron, the pro-oxidants and zinc and selenium may influence calcification process in CCP patients. Hypoxia-related tissue injury due to the formation of oxidised haemoglobin may also contribute to the pathogenesis of calcification in pancreas.

4. Superoxide dismutase
Superoxide dismutase are an important antioxidant defense in nearly all cells exposed to oxygen as a class of enzymes that catalyzes the dismutation of free radicals due to existence of copper and Zn in tofu (according to the study of "Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase gene dosage and cell resistance to oxidative stress: a review" by Peskin AV., posted in Pubmed, researchers found that
There are data that increasing only Cu,Zn-SOD can be toxic, and the balance between Cu,Zn-SOD and peroxide-removing enzymes is supposed to be of prime importance in the antioxidant defence. Role of Cu,Zn-SOD deregulation in carcinogenesis is discussed.

5. Menstrual cramp and pain
The existence of Omega 3 fatty acid reduces the production of prostaglandin hormone, by balancing the ratio of Omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, resulting in lessening the movement of abdominal muscle that cause menstrual cramps and pain , according to the study of "Effect of Clupeonella grimmi (anchovy/kilka) fish oil on dysmenorrhoea" by Moghadamnia AA, Mirhosseini N, Abadi MH, Omranirad A, Omidvar S., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20795425), researchers found that There was also a marked reduction in low back pain and abdominal pain (P < 0.05), and participants needed significantly fewer rescue doses of ibuprofen while using fish oil.

6. Selenium
Selenium is classified as one of antioxidant trace mineral that helps to increase the immune function to fight the forming of free radicals, infection and inflammation caused by oxidation, irregular cells growth, virus and bacteria, etc., according tothe study of "Protective role of intraperitoneally administrated vitamin E and selenium on the levels of total lipid, total cholesterol, and fatty acid composition of muscle and liver tissues in rats" by Yilmaz O, Celik S, Cay M, Naziroğlu M., posted in PubMed, researchers found that the level of total lipid and cholesterol in muscle and liver tissues were reduced by administrating vitamin E and Se together. Additionally, the fatty acid synthesis in the muscle and liver tissues was decreased by this process) and prevent plague accumulated cause of Atherosclerosis (according to the study of 'Vitamin-mineral supplementation and the progression of atherosclerosis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials" by Bleys J, Miller ER 3rd, Pastor-Barriuso R, Appel LJ, Guallar E., posted in PubMed) thus reducing the risk of heart diseases and hypertension.

7. Etc.
Soy sauce
Soy sauce is a seasoning produced by fermenting soybeans and filamentous fungus, along with water and salt after a period of sometime, it yields a moromi or thick mash of cereal to obtain soy sauce by pressing it to liquid form. Tamari is made by collecting the liquid which was pressed and the liquid drained drains from miso after a certain time of fermentation.

Nutritional supplements
1. Sodium
2. protein
3. Fat
4. Niacin (Vitamin B3)
5. Iron
6. Manganese
7. Magnesium
7. Phosphorus
8. Riboflavin
9. Vitamin B6
10. Isoflavones
11. Etc

A. Health benefits according to studies
1. Cardiovascular health
In the investigation of dietary proteins and their effect in heart diseases found that a direct cholesterol lowering effect of proteins has not been shown. Despite earlier research indicating that soy protein has cardioprotective effects as compared to other proteins, these observations have not been confirmed by randomized placebo-controlled trials. However, most experts recommend the consumption of foods rich in plant proteins as alternatives to meat and dairy products rich in saturated fat and containing cholesterol, according to "Dietary proteins and atherosclerosis" by Darioli R.(a)

2. Perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR)
In the study of isolated a halophilic lactic acid bacterium, Tetragenococcus halophilus Th221, from soy sauce moromi and the its effect on serum total immunoglobulin E, found that The change in serum total immunoglobulin E improved significantly at the end of the trial compared with the beginning in this group (p < 0.05). The safety of Th221 treatment was confirmed by laboratory tests and inspection of the general condition of each subject and concluded that Th221 can be expected to safely improve the symptoms of PAR, according to "Clinical efficacy of halophilic lactic acid bacterium Tetragenococcus halophilus Th221 from soy sauce moromi for perennial allergic rhinitis" by Nishimura I, Igarashi T, Enomoto T, Dake Y, Okuno Y, Obata A.(b)

3. Anti-allergic activities
In the assessment of oral supplementation of Shoyu polysaccharides (SPS) and its effective intervention for patients with perennial allergic rhinitis found that evaluation of the medication's effectiveness after 4 weeks treatment showed significant differences between the SPS- and placebo-treated groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, SPS of soy sauce improved the quality of life for patients with perennial allergic rhinitis, and soy sauce would be useful in an anti-allergic therapy utilizing everyday foods, according to "Quality of life improvement with soy sauce ingredients, Shoyu polysaccharides, in perennial allergic rhinitis: a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study" by Kobayashi M, Matsushita H, Shioya I, Nagai M, Tsukiyama R, Saito M, Sugita T, Sugimura T, Yamamoto K.(c)

4. Breast cancer
In the analyzing of Shoyu and on the gastric mucosa of the rat found that the animals given shoyu were smaller than the controls; 15 intact rats receiving the sauce were healthy at 33 months compared with 7 controls. Only 9 of 50 operated rats lived 33 months. Breast tumors developed in 10 control rats but in none given shoyu. The distribution of other tumors was the same,... and concluded that Shoyu did not appear to be a carcinogen in the rat; its prolonged use impaired neither health nor longevity. Long-term use was associated with gastric mucus loss and nuclear changes in a few rats, occasionally with a mild gastritis. according to "Long-term effect of shoyu (Japanese soy sauce) on the gastric mucosa of the rat" by MacDonald WC, Dueck JW.(4)

5. Hypolipidemic effect
In the observation of Soy sauce (Shoyu), a traditional Japanese fermented seasoning and its effect on cholesterol level found that in a 4-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group study, hyperlipidemic men (TG >150 mg/dl) were treated with 600 mg of SPS (n=15) or placebo (n=15) daily. After 4 weeks, serum TG levels in the SPS-treated group were significantly (P<0.05) lower than the baseline (0 week). In conclusion, SPS of soy sauce reduce lipid absorption, and soy sauce is a potentially promising seasoning for the treatment of hyperlipidemia through food, according to "Hypolipidemic effect of Shoyu polysaccharides from soy sauce in animals and humans" by Kobayashi M, Magishi N, Matsushita H, Hashimoto T, Fujimoto M, Suzuki M, Tsuji K, Saito M, Inoue E, Yoshikawa Y, Matsuura T.(e)

6. Etc.

B. Health benefits according to concentration
1. Tryptophan
Tryptophan is one of the 10 essential amino acids which the body uses to synthesize the proteins for brain cells need, thus enhancing the nerve cells in information transmitting between themselves and cells in the parts of the body that reduces the risk of anxiety and depression, according to the study of "The effects of tryptophan depletion on neural responses to emotional words in remitted depression" by Roiser JP, Levy J, Fromm SJ, Nugent AC, Talagala SL, Hasler G, Henn FA, Sahakian BJ, Drevets WC.(1)

2. Manganese
Manganese beside plays an vital role for the proper and normal growth of human bone structure (accodring to the study of "Bone formation within alumina tubes: effect of calcium, manganese, and chromium dopants" by Pabbruwe MB, Standard OC, Sorrell CC, Howlett CR., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15109850)), it also helps to reduce the risk of cancer, (according to the study of "The effects of 3, 4 or 5 amino salicylic acids on manganese-induced neuronal death: ER stress and mitochondrial complexes" by Yoon H, Lee GH, Kim DS, Kim KW, Kim HR, Chae HJ., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21477646 researchers indicated that the salicylate analogues and the antioxidants did not mediate ER stress in this model. The salicylate analogues reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reversed the deficient mitochondrial membrane potential that was induced by Mn. Taken together, the 3, 4, 5 ASA worked in a similar way, regulating the Mn-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and protecting cells.

3. Protein
Protein beside is important building block of bones, muscles, cartilage, skin, and blood, it also enhances the nervous system in information transmitting between cells and cells of the other parts of the body, thus reducing the risk of nervous tension, (according to the study of "The planar polarity protein Scribble1 is essential for neuronal plasticity and brain function" by Moreau MM, Piguel N, Papouin T, Koehl M, Durand CM, Rubio ME, Loll F, Richard EM, Mazzocco C, Racca C, Oliet SH, Abrous DN, Montcouquiol M, Sans N, posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20660256)

4. Niacin or vitamin B3
Niacin or vitamin B3 beside is important in production of energy in metabolism of carbohydrate, it also essential for DNA repairing, according to the study of `Niacin deficiency delays DNA excision repair and increases spontaneous and nitrosourea-induced chromosomal instability in rat bone marrow`by Kostecki LM, Thomas M, Linford G, Lizotte M, Toxopeus L, Bartleman AP, Kirkland JB., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17618655), production of steroid hormones in the adrenal gland, improving blood circulation and lowering the bad cholesterol (LDL) levels., according to the study of `Lowering LDL cholesterol with margarine containing plant stanol/sterol esters: is it still relevant in 2011?`by Doggrell SA., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21296266)

5. Etc.

C. Other health benefits
Since soy sauce contains high amount of sodium, a trace mineral is classified as a cause of heart diseases and stroke if eating in high amount. In fact with correct amount, soy sauce not only helps to replace the daily intake of sodium but also enhances health benefits
1. Cholesterol
Certain studies found that certain types of soy sauce (popular in Chinese cookery) have been shown to reduce the levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) because of the existence of large amounts of the isoflavones, so choose your soy sauce wisely, according to the study of `Soy isoflavones lower serum total and LDL cholesterol in humans: a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials`by Taku K, Umegaki K, Sato Y, Taki Y, Endoh K, Watanabe S., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17413118)

2. Isoflavones
Isoflavones is one of the weak estrogen that can compete with estrogen for the same receptor sites, as it decreasing the health risks of excess estrogen, promoting healthy menstrual cycle and reducing the risk of cancers caused by high levels of strong estrogen., according to the study of `Red clover and soy isoflavones-an in vitro safety assessment`by Reiter E, Gerster P, Jungbauer A., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21801124), researchers wrote that
Isoflavones and plant extracts significantly reduced the proliferation activity of the treated cancer cell lines.

3. Riboflavin
Riboflavin or vitamin B2 besides is important for the production of energy in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins due to its coenzymes, flavin adenine dinucleotide and Flavin mononucleotide properties, it also is the best of natural element for treating migraines and muscle pain reliever used together with magnesium, according to the study of `Effectiveness of high-dose riboflavin in migraine prophylaxis. A randomized controlled trial`by Schoenen J, Jacquy J, Lenaerts M., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9484373)

4. Magnesium
Magnesium beside helps to maintain the right ratio with calcium, thus aiding the digestive system in absorption of calcium, according to the study of `Associations of calcium and magnesium in serum and hair with bone mineral density in premenopausal women`by Song CH, Barrett-Connor E, Chung JH, Kim SH, Kim KS., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17848724) it also reduces the risk of irregular heart beat and impairs glucose tolerance, according to the study of `Dietary magnesium deficiency induces heart rhythm changes, impairs glucose tolerance, and decreases serum cholesterol in post menopausal women`by Nielsen FH, Milne DB, Klevay LM, Gallagher S, Johnson L., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17536123)

5. Etc.

B. Quoted From the world most healthy herbs
1. Insulin sensitive
Soybean helps to normalize plasma glucose and insulin homeostasis, according to "Increased insulin sensitivity and changes in the expression profile of key insulin regulatory genes and beta cell transcription factors in diabetic KKAy-mice after feeding with a soy bean protein rich diet high in isoflavone content" by Nordentoft I, Jeppesen PB, Hong J, Abudula R, Hermansen K.(1)

2. Cardiovascular diseases
Soy protein reduces reduces the levels of serum lipoprotein, decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-C/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triacylglycerol/HDL-C and TC/HDL-Cpostmenopausal women are at risk of cardiovascular disease, according to "Effects of soy bean on serum paraoxonase 1 activity and lipoproteins in hyperlipidemic postmenopausal women" by Shidfar F, Ehramphosh E, Heydari I, Haghighi L, Hosseini S, Shidfar S.(2)

3. Adipogenesis and Adipolysis
Germinated soy bean protein hydrolysates had an effect on inhibition of lipid storage in adypocites and increasing lipolysis, according to "Effect of Germinated Soybean Protein Hydrolysates on Adipogenesis and Adipolysis in 3T3-L1 Cells" by González-Espinosa de Los Monteros LA, Ramón-Gallegos E, Torres-Torres N, Mora-Escobedo R.(3)

4. Antioxidant effects
Extract from Virginia-grown soybean seeds had exerted its antioxidant effect when compared for their total phenolic contents (TPC), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(*)) scavenging activities, according to "Comparison of different strategies for soybean antioxidant extraction" by Chung H, Ji X, Canning C, Sun S, Zhou K.(4)

5. Diabetes and hypertension
Soybean
phenolic-rich extracts has exerted the inhibitory activities of phenolic-rich extracts from soybean on α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) activities in vitro, according to "Soybean phenolic-rich extracts inhibit key-enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes (α-amylase and α-glucosidase) and hypertension (angiotensin I converting enzyme) in vitro" by Ademiluyi AO, Oboh G.(5)

6. Aspartic acid
Aspartic acid not only helps to protect the body from drug toxicity and radiation, it also plays an essential role for the brain in information transmitting across the synapse, thus enhancing the learning and memory mechanism, according to the study of "Disinhibition-Mediated LTP in the Hippocampus is Synapse Specific" by Ormond J, Woodin MA., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21954377

7. Histidine
Histidine plays an important role in promoting white and red blood cells, thus increasing the immune system in fight against forming of free radical and reducing the risk anemia., according to the study of "The role of histidine in the anemia of folate deficiency" by Cooperman JM, Lopez R., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12486209), researchers concluded that concluded that folate deficiency causes histidine depletion through increased urinary excretion of this amino acid. Feeding histidine replenishes tissue levels of histidine, resulting in hemoglobin regeneration. Folic acid administration results in return of histidine to normal urinary levels. Thus, a combination of folic acid histidine would be beneficial for folate deficient individuals.

8. Serine
As an amino acid, serine in soybean not only helps to maintain proper muscle build up by synthesizing fatty acids and proteins, it also is important for brain in to transport information between themselves and cells in other parts of the body, according to the study of "Transport systems of serine at the brain barriers and in brain parenchymal cells" by Kasai Y, Tachikawa M, Hirose S, Akanuma S, Hosoya K., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21592122)

9. Alanine
Alanine not only is essential in production of energy in glucose synthesis (according to the study ofGlucose and insulin effects on the novo amino acid synthesis in young men: studies with stable isotope labeled alanine, glycine, leucine, and lysine" by Robert JJ, Bier DM, Zhao XH, Matthews DE, Young VR., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6815417) it also enhances the immune system in production of anti bodies., according to the study of "The immune response of tetraparental mice to two synthetic amino acid polymers: "high-conjugation" 2,4 dinitrophenyl-glutamic acid57-lysine38-alanine5 (DNP-GLA5) and glutamic acid60 alanine30 tyrosine10 (GAT10)" by Warner CM, Fitzmaurice M, Maurer PH, Merryman CF, Schmerr MJ., posted in The Journey of Immunology (http://www.jimmunol.org/content/111/6/1887)

10. Isoleucine
Another animo acid helps to maintain the body tissues and store glycogen in muscles thereby reducing the risk of muscle breaking down during physical activity., according to the study of "Isoleucine, a potent plasma glucose-lowering amino acid, stimulates glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes" by Doi M, Yamaoka I, Fukunaga T, Nakayama M., posted in PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14651987), researchers that isoleucine stimulates the insulin-independent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle cells, which may contribute to the plasma glucose-lowering effect of isoleucine in normal rats.

C. Quoted from Phytochemicals in Foods
Daidzein is a phytochemical in the Isoflavones, belonging to the group of Flavonoids (polyphenols), found abundantly in food of the family of legumes, soy, alfalfa sprouts, red clover, chickpeas, peanuts, etc.
1. Breast cancer
In the investigation of the anticancer effects and cellular apoptosis pathways induced by daidzein, using human MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, found that daidzein-induced ROS generation was accompanied by disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, down-regulation of bcl-2, and up-regulation of bax, which led to the release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria into the cytosol, which, in turn, resulted in the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-7, and ultimately in cell death, The induction of the mitochondrial caspase-dependent pathway was confirmed by pretreatment with pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, according to "Daidzein induces MCF-7 breast cancer cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway" by Jin S, Zhang QY, Kang XM, Wang JX, Zhao WH.(1)

2. Ameliorative effect
In the investigation of Estrogen deficiency was produced in female Sprague-Dawley rats by surgical removal of both the ovaries and these animals were used 4 weeks later and observation of Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxations due to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside, found that Administration of daidzein (0.2 mgkg(-1)day(-1), sc 0.4 mgkg(-1)day(-1), sc and 0.8 mgkg(-1)day(-1), sc) and Atorvastatin (30 mgkg(-1)day(-1), po Positive Control) for one week markedly improved vascular endothelial dysfunction due to increase in nitric oxide bioavailability perhaps by inhibiting caveolin-1 and activation of PI3K-AKT pathway, according to 'Ameliorative effect of daidzein: a caveolin-1 inhibitor in vascular endothelium dysfunction induced by ovariectomy" by Sharma S, Singh M, Sharma PL.(2)

3. Prostate cancer
In evaluation of a mixture of soy isoflavones (genistein, daidzein, glycitein) and theirs effect on Prostate cancer, found that Daidzein could be the component of soy that protects against genistein-induced metastasis. Daidzein inhibited cell growth and synergized with radiation, affecting APE1/Ref-1, NF-kappaB and HIF-1alpha, but at lower levels than genistein and soy, in AR+ and AR- PCa cells, suggesting it is an AR-independent mechanism, according to "Daidzein effect on hormone refractory prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo compared to genistein and soy extract: potentiation of radiotherapy" by Singh-Gupta V, Zhang H, Yunker CK, Ahmad Z, Zwier D, Sarkar FH, Hillman GG.(3)
4. Cellular Integrity
In the investigation of the protective effect of two major soy isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, in combination on the status of glycoconjugates in plasma, found that Oral administration of genistein + daidzein (20 mg + 20 mg kg(-1) bw/day) to DMBA treated rats significantly (p< 0.05) brought back the status of glycoconjugates to near normal range. The present study thus demonstrated that genistein and daidzein in combination, according to "Genistein and Daidzein, in Combination, Protect Cellular Integrity during 7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley Rats" by Pugalendhi P, Manoharan S, Suresh K, Baskaran N.(4)

5. Anti tumors
In the establishment of the chromatographic fingerprints for the anti-tumor flavonoids of Caulis spatholobi (SSCE)(16 characteristic peaks from 10 batches of medicinal materials. Among them, the peaks 1, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, and 16 were identified 3,4-dihodroxybenzoic acid, 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid, epicatechin, puerarin, daidzein, liquiritigenin, calycosin, genistein, formononetin, and prunetin, respectively.) indicatedthat The method is convenient, reproducibility and stability. It can used for quality control of the anti-tumor flavonoids of C. spatholobi (SSCE), according to '[Study on HPLC chromatographic fingerprint of anti-tumor active site SSCE of Caulis spatholobi].[Article in Chinese]" by Wang H, Liu Y, Zeng Z, He W.(5)

6. Endometrial cancer
In the evaluation of Legume, soy, tofu, and isoflavone intake and endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women, found that reduced risk of endometrial cancer was associated with total isoflavone intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥7.82 vs <1.59 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.91), daidzein intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥3.54 vs <0.70 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.46 to 0.90), and genistein intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥3.40 vs <0.69 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.91). No statistically significant association with endometrial cancer risk was observed for increasing intake of legumes, soy, tofu, or glycitein, according to "Legume, soy, tofu, and isoflavone intake and endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women in the multiethnic cohort study" by Ollberding NJ, Lim U, Wilkens LR, Setiawan VW, Shvetsov YB, Henderson BE, Kolonel LN, Goodman MT.(6)

7. Anti-allergic activities
In the investigation of the biocatalytic synthesis of xylooligosaccharides of daidzein, using cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus and Aspergillus sp. β-xylosidase, found that The cultured cells of C. roseus converted daidzein into its 4'-O-β-glucoside, 7-O-β-glucoside, and 7-O-β-primeveroside, which was a new compound. The 7-O-β-primeveroside of daidzein was further xylosylated by Aspergillus sp. β-xylosidase to daidzein trisaccharide, i.e., 7-O-[6-O-(4-O-(β-d-xylopyranosyl))-β-d-xylopyranosyl]-β-d-glucopyranoside, which was a new compound. The 4'-O-β-glucoside, 7-O-β-glucoside, and 7-O-β-primeveroside of daidzein exerted DPPH free-radical scavenging and superoxide radical scavenging activity. On the other hand, 7-O-β-glucoside and 7-O-β-primeveroside of daidzein showed inhibitory effects on IgE antibody production, according to "Synthesis of xylooligosaccharides of daidzein and their anti-oxidant and anti-allergic activities" by Shimoda K, Hamada H, Hamada H.(7)

8. Menopausal symptoms
In the examination of the efficacy of a supplement containing natural S-(-)equol, a daidzein metabolite, in reducing menopausal symptoms, found that the beneficial effects of a 10-mg natural S-(-)equol supplement is consumed daily for 12 weeks on major menopausal symptoms, specifically, hot flushes and neck or shoulder muscle stiffness, in postmenopausal Japanese women. This supplement offers a promising alternative for management of menopausal symptoms, according to "A natural s-equol supplement alleviates hot flushes and other menopausal symptoms in equol nonproducing postmenopausal Japanese women" by Aso T, Uchiyama S, Matsumura Y, Taguchi M, Nozaki M, Takamatsu K, Ishizuka B, Kubota T, Mizunuma H, Ohta H.(8)

9. Anti skin aging
In the explanation of Oestrogen (17β estradiol) and the dietary antioxidants resveratrol, genistein and S-equol, an isoflavone produced from the gut biotransformation of soy daidzein, are effective agents to reduce ageing in skin, indicated that the evidence to date suggests that the primary mechanism of action of these antioxidants is to activate oestrogen receptor β (ERβ), which in turn enhances the expression of antioxidant enzymes and inhibits the expression of snail, a transcription factor that regulates keratinocyte cell proliferation and migration. Based on their selectivity, ERβ agents provide a treatment option for ageing skin without the potential safety issues associated with oestrogen therapy, according to "Ageing skin: oestrogen receptor β agonists offer an approach to change the outcome" by Jackson RL, Greiwe JS, Schwen RJ.(9)

10. Cardioprotective effect
In the investigation of the involvement of caveolin in attenuation of the cardioprotective effect of IPC during DM in rat, found that attenuation of the cardioprotection in diabetic heart may be due to decrease the IPC mediated release of NO in the diabetic myocardium, which may be due to up -regulation of caveolin and subsequently decreased activity of eNOS, according to "Possible involvement of caveolin in attenuation of cardioprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning in diabetic rat heart" by Ajmani P, Yadav HN, Singh M, Sharma PL.(10)

11. Bone density
In the observation of the association between habitual phyto-oestrogen intake and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) of the calcanaeum as a marker of bone density, found that enterolignans and equol were positively associated with bone density in postmenopausal women, but this association became non-significant when dietary Ca was added to the model. In the lowest quintile of Ca intake, soya isoflavones were positively associated with bone density in postmenopausal women (β = 1·4; P < 0·1). The present results therefore suggest that non-soya isoflavones are associated with bone density independent of Ca, whereas the association with soya or soya isoflavones is affected by dietary Ca, according to "Association between dietary phyto-oestrogens and bone density in men and postmenopausal women" by Kuhnle GG, Ward HA, Vogiatzoglou A, Luben RN, Mulligan A, Wareham NJ, Forouhi NG, Khaw KT.(11)

12. Etc.

Genistein is a phytochemical in the Isoflavones, belonging to the group of Flavonoids (polyphenols), found abundantly in food of the family of legumes, soy, alfalfa sprouts, red clover, chickpeas, peanuts, etc.
1. Bladder Cancer
In a phase 2 randomized, placebo-controlled trial investigated whether daily, oral genistein (300 or 600 mg/day as the purified soy extract G-2535) for 14-21 days before surgery alters molecular pathways in bladder epithelial tissue in 59 subjects diagnosed with urothelial bladder cancer (median age 71), found that G-2535 treatment was well tolerated; observed toxicities were primarily mild to moderate gastrointestinal or metabolic and usually not attributed to study drug. Genistein was detected in plasma and urine of subjects receiving G-2535 at concentrations greater than placebo subjects' but were not dose-dependent. Reduction in bladder cancer tissue p-EGFR staining between the placebo arm and the combined genistein arms was significant at the protocol-specified significance level of 0.10 (p=0.07), according to "A Phase 2 Cancer Chemoprevention Biomarker Trial of Isoflavone G-2535 (Genistein) in Presurgical Bladder Cancer Patients" by Messing E, Gee JR, Saltzstein DR, Kim K, Disant'agnese PA, Kolesar J, Harris L, Faerber A, Havighurst TC, Young JM, Efros M, Getzenberg RH, Wheeler MA, Tangrea J, Parnes HL, House M, Busby JE, Hohl RJ, Bailey HH.(1)

2. Immunomodulation And Anti-Inflammation
In the review of new concepts have emerged in relation to mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of carcinogenesis processes and associated inflammatory effects, found that the effects of polyphenols on the adaptative and innate immune cells that could infiltrate the tumor. Reduction of chronic inflammation or its downstream consequences may represent a key mechanism in the fight of cancer development and polyphenols could reduce various pro-inflammatory substance productions through targeting signal transduction or through antioxidant effects, according to "Immunomodulation And Anti-Inflammatory Roles Of Polyphenols As Anticancer Agents" by Ghiringhelli F, Rébé C, Hichami A, Delmas D.(2)

3. Bone density
In the investigation of the association between habitual phyto-oestrogen intake and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) of the calcanaeum as a marker of bone density, found that the non-soya isoflavones formononetin and biochanin A were marginally significant or significantly associated with BUA in postmenopausal women (β = 1·2; P < 0·1) and men (β = 1·2; P < 0·05), respectively; enterolignans and equol were positively associated with bone density in postmenopausal women, but this association became non-significant when dietary Ca was added to the model. In the lowest quintile of Ca intake, soya isoflavones were positively associated with bone density in postmenopausal women (β = 1·4; P < 0·1), according to "Association between dietary phyto-oestrogens and bone density in men and postmenopausal women" by Kuhnle GG, Ward HA, Vogiatzoglou A, Luben RN, Mulligan A, Wareham NJ, Forouhi NG, Khaw KT.(3)

4. Antioxidant effects
In the testing effects of the soy isoflavone genistein on antioxidant enzymes in DU145 prostate cancer cells, found that Genistein significantly decreased reactive oxygen species levels and induced the expression of the antioxidant enzymes manganese (Mn) superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, which were associated with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) pathways. The induced expression of catalase, MnSOD, and PTEN were attenuated by pretreatment with a pharmacological inhibitor for AMPK. Furthermore, PTEN is essential for genistein activity, as shown by PTEN transfection in PTEN-deficient PC3 cells. Thus, genistein induces antioxidant enzymes through AMPK activation and increased PTEN expression. indicating the effects of genistein primarily depend on AMPK, according to "The antioxidant effects of genistein are associated with AMP-activated protein kinase activation and PTEN induction in prostate cancer cells" by Park CE, Yun H, Lee EB, Min BI, Bae H, Choe W, Kang I, Kim SS, Ha J.(4)

5. Anti cancers
In the determination of Genistein, the predominant isoflavones found in soy, has been shown to inhibit the carcinogenesis in animal models, indicated that there are growing body of experimental evidence that show the inhibition of human cancer cells by genistein through the modulation of genes that are related to the control of cell cycle and apoptosis. Moreover, it has been shown that genistein inhibits the activation of NF-kappa B and Akt signaling pathways, both of which are known to maintain a homeostatic balance between cell survival and apoptosis. Genistein is commonly known as phytoestrogen, which targets estrogen- and androgen-mediated signaling pathways in the processes of carcinogenesis, according to "Soy isoflavones and cancer prevention" by Sarkar FH, Li Y.(5)

6. Prostate cells
In the investigation of the hypothesis that the soy-isoflavone genistein could protect DNA of LAPC-4 prostate cells from oxidative stress-related damage by enhancing the expression of antioxidative genes and proteins, found that genistein protects prostate cells from oxidative stress-related DNA damage presumably by inducing the expression of antioxidative products, such as metallothioneins. Genistein, therefore, might counteract the age-related decline of important antioxidative defence systems which in turn maintain DNA integrity, according to "Genistein protects prostate cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage and induces expression of genes involved in the defence against oxidative stress" by Raschke M, Rowland IR, Magee PJ, Pool-Zobel BL(6)

7. Breast cancer
In the investigation of the potential preventive effects of lycopene and genistein, alone and in combination, on breast cancer development in female Wistar rats treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), a carcinogen known to induce breast tumors.
found that treatment was continued for 20 wk. Rats treated with DMBA developed mammary tumors with 100% tumor incidence during the 20-wk study. Inhibition of mammary cancer incidence by lycopene (70%), genistein (60%) and their combination (40%) was observed. Tumor weight decreased by 48%, 61%, and 67%, and mean tumor volume decreased by 18%, 35%, and 65% with lycopene, genistein, and lycopene + genistein, respectively (P < 0.01 for the combination). The proportions of adenocarcinoma masses decreased with lycopene and genistein combination (P < 0.05). Administration of lycopene and genistein combination suppressed breast cancer development and was associated with a decrease in MDA, 8-isoprostane, and 8-OhdG levels and with an increase in serum lycopene and genistein levels. Animals administered DMBA developed breast cancer, which was associated with increased expression of Bcl-2 and decreased expression of Bax, caspase 3, and caspase 9 in mammary tissues, according to "Inhibitory effects of combination of lycopene and genistein on 7,12- dimethyl benz(a)anthracene-induced breast cancer in rats" by Sahin K, Tuzcu M, Sahin N, Akdemir F, Ozercan I, Bayraktar S, Kucuk O.(7)

8. Neuroprotective effects
in the investigation of whether GEN could alleviate oxidative damage induced by beta-amyloid peptides 25-35 (Abeta25-35) in PC12 cells, found that GEN attenuated the cytotoxicity and partially prevented apoptosis induced by Abeta25-35. GEN dramatically attenuated ROS levels induced by Abeta25-35 in PC12 cells. In addition, GEN significantly reversed the reduction of MMP caused by Abeta25-35 to maintain the normal levels of the cells. The GSH/GSSG ratio in GEN pretreated groups significantly increased compared to the groups without GEN pretreatment. GEN reversed Abeta25-35 induced down regulation of the protein expression of gamma-GCS, Nrf2 and HO-1, according to "Genistein as a neuroprotective antioxidant attenuates redox imbalance induced by beta-amyloid peptides 25-35 in PC12 cells" by Ma W, Yuan L, Yu H, Ding B, Xi Y, Feng J, Xiao R.(8)

9. Anti diabetes
In the investigation of the effect of genistein on beta-cell proliferation and cellular signaling related to this effect and further determined its antidiabetic potential in insulin-deficient diabetic mice, found that genistein induced protein expression of cyclin D1, a major cell-cycle regulator essential for beta-cell growth. Dietary intake of genistein significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, concomitant with improved islet beta-cell proliferation, survival, and mass. These results demonstrate that genistein may be a natural antidiabetic agent by directly modulating pancreatic beta-cell function via activation of the cAMP/PKA-dependent ERK1/2 signaling pathway, according to "Genistein induces pancreatic beta-cell proliferation through activation of multiple signaling pathways and prevents insulin-deficient diabetes in mice" by Fu Z, Zhang W, Zhen W, Lum H, Nadler J, Bassaganya-Riera J, Jia Z, Wang Y, Misra H, Liu D.(9)

10. Bone homeostasis
In the deiermination of the effect of genistein on bone homeostasis in mandibular subchondral bone of rats.Methods:Female SD rats were administered with genistein (10 and 50 mg/kg) or placebo by oral gavage for 6 weeks, found that the low and high doses of genistein significantly increased the expression of ERβ, while ERα expression was increased by the low dose genistein and decreased by the high dose genistein. ERβ silencing abrogated most of the effects of genistein treatment.Conclusion:In rat mandibular condylar subchondral bone, low-dose genistein increases bone formation and inhibit bone resorption, while excess genistein inhibits both bone formation and resorption, according to"Dose-dependent effects of genistein on bone homeostasis in rats' mandibular subchondral bone" by
Li YQ, Xing XH, Wang H, Weng XL, Yu SB, Dong GY.(10)

11. Obesity
In the study of the role of ER alpha and ER beta in a model of nutrition induced obesity, found that Treatment with E2 and Alpha decreased body weight, total cholesterol and VLDL. Visceral fat mass, adipocyte size, and serum leptin were reduced by E2, Alpha and Beta. In the soleus muscle, treatment with E2 and Beta modulated Igf1 and Pax7 gene expression and resulted in larger muscle fibers, according to "Impact of estradiol, ER subtype specific agonists and genistein on energy homeostasis in a rat model of nutrition induced obesity" by
Weigt C, Hertrampf T, Zoth N, Fritzemeier KH, Diel P.(11)

Etc.

Glycitein is a phytochemical in the Isoflavones, belonging to the group of Flavonoids (polyphenols), found abundantly in food of the family of legumes, soy, peanuts, chick peas, fava beans, alfalfa, kudzu, etc.
1. Prostate cancer
In the examination of the effects of the soy isoflavone glycitein on cellular differentiation in prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1, WPE1-NB14, and RWPE-2), found that Glycitein significantly inhibited RWPE-1 cellular proliferation at concentrations ranging from 0.4 to 50 microM. Expression of the luminal epithelial cell marker cytokeratin 18 was not affected by glycitein treatment in the WPE1-NB14 and RWPE-2 cell line, according to "Basal cell induced differentiation of noncancerous prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1) by glycitein" by Clubbs EA, Bomser JA(1)

2. Endometrial cancer
In the observation of the effects of Phytochemicals found in soy and other legumes in reducing the risk of endometrial cancer, found that a reduced risk of endometrial cancer was associated with total isoflavone intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥7.82 vs <1.59 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.91), daidzein intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥3.54 vs <0.70 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.46 to 0.90), and genistein intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥3.40 vs <0.69 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.91). No statistically significant association with endometrial cancer risk was observed for increasing intake of legumes, soy, tofu, or glycitein. Truncated age-adjusted incidence rates of endometrial cancer for the highest vs lowest quintile of total isoflavone intake were 55 vs 107 per 100 000 women per year, respectively, according to "Legume, soy, tofu, and isoflavone intake and endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women in the multiethnic cohort study" by Ollberding NJ, Lim U, Wilkens LR, Setiawan VW, Shvetsov YB, Henderson BE, Kolonel LN, Goodman MT.(2)

3. Ovarian cancer
In the evaluation of the impact of phytoestrogen consumption on breast cancer risk and its role on ovarian cancer, found that No statistically significant associations were found with any of the phytoestrogens under evaluation. However, there was a suggestion of an inverse association with total phytoestrogen consumption (from foods and supplements), with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.62 (95% CI: 0.38-1.00; p for trend: 0.04) for the highest vs. lowest tertile of consumption, after adjusting for reproductive covariates, age, race, education, BMI, and total energy. Further adjustment for smoking and physical activity attenuated risk estimates (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.41-1.08), according to "Phytoestrogen consumption from foods and supplements and epithelial ovarian cancer risk: a population-based case control study" by Bandera EV, King M, Chandran U, Paddock LE, Rodriguez-Rodriguez L, Olson SH.(3)

4. Antioxidants
in the evaluation of the antioxidant activity and contents of various polyphenol classes in the seeds of seven soybean varieties of different seed color and one yellow seed cultivar, found that antioxidant activity of seed extracts was evaluated by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity assay. A positive linear correlation between antioxidant activity and contents of total polyphenols and anthocyanins was established. The highest antioxidant activity was observed in the extracts of black and brown varieties, which also showed high levels of all polyphenol classes examined. Yellow seed had the highest total isoflavone content (3.62 mg/g of dry material). The highest concentration of total daidzein was determined in black seeds (>2.0 mg/g of dry material), and the highest total glycitein and genistein contents occurred in the yellow cultivar (0.53 and 1.49 mg/g of dry material, respectively). According to our results, varieties of black and brown seeds could be of special interest not only for their large content of total polyphenols, ranging from 4.94 to 6.22 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g of dry material, but also for their high content of natural antioxidants such as anthocyanins, according to "Polyphenol content and antioxidant properties of colored soybean seeds from central europe" by Malenčić D, Cvejić J, Miladinović J.(4)

5. Cervical cancer
In the evaluation of the effect of a soy-derived isoflavone mixture (designated as SI-I, containing 71% daidzein, 14.3% genistein and 14.7% glycitein) on HeLa cells and its mechanism were investigated. SI-I in concentration range 5-80 μg/ml significantly reduced the survival rate of HeLa cells by MTT assay, found that SI-I inhibited HeLa cell growth through inducing apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway and comparisons with reported data indicated that synergistic effect existed between the isoflavone species contained in SI-I. It is proposed that natural soy-derived isoflavones are potential candidates as chemotherapeutic agents against human cervical cancer, according to "Soy-derived isoflavones inhibit HeLa cell growth by inducing apoptosis" by Xiao JX, Huang GQ, Geng X, Qiu HW.(5)

6. Colon cancer
In the investigation of the cellular effects of soy isoflavones (composed of genistein, daidzein, and glycitein) in DLD-1 human colon adenocarcinoma cells with or without ER-β gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi), found that maintaining the expression of ER-β is crucial in mediating the growth-suppressive effects of soy isoflavones against colon tumors. Thus upregulation of ER-β status by specific food-borne ER-ligands such as soy isoflavones could potentially be a dietary prevention or therapeutic strategy for colon cancer, according to "Estrogen receptor-β mediates the inhibition of DLD-1 human colon adenocarcinoma cells by soy isoflavones" by Bielecki A, Roberts J, Mehta R, Raju J.(6)

7. Osteoclast differentiation and apoptosis
In the investigation of the effects of glycitein on osteoclast differentiation and apoptosis in vitro,
found that Osteoclast generation was inhibited by glycitein in a biphasic-dose-dependent manner and showed the greatest inhibitory effects at 10 nM (-70%, p < 0.01). Glycitein increased caspase 3/7 activity by 15% at a concentration of 10 nM (p < 0.001). Further, 10 nM glycitein significantly decreased the expression of IL-6 (-53%, p < 0.05) and RANKL (-64%, p < 0.05) in osteoblasts but did not change mRNA levels of OPG, according to "Glycitein decreases the generation of murine osteoclasts and increases apoptosis" by Winzer M, Rauner M, Pietschmann P.(7)

8. Anti allergic effects
in the investigation of the production of beta-maltooligosaccharides of glycitein and daidzein using Lactobacillus delbrueckii and cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) as biocatalysts,
found that The 7-O-beta-glucosides of glycitein and daidzein and 7-O-beta-maltoside of glycitein showed inhibitory effects on IgE antibody production. On the other hand, beta-glucosides of glycitein and daidzein exerted 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free-radical scavenging activity and supeoxide-radical scavenging activity, according to "Synthesis of beta-maltooligosaccharides of glycitein and daidzein and their anti-oxidant and anti-allergic activities" by Shimoda K, Hamada H.(8)

9. Anti-photoaging effects
In the evaluation of purified soy isoflavone extract from soybean cake for the protective effects on UVB-induced damage, Fraction 3, which contains the aglycone group (daidzein, genistein and glycitein) and acetylglucoside group (acetyldaidzin, acetylgenistin and acetylglycitin) of soy isoflavones, could inhibit UVB-induced death of human keratinocytes and reduce the level of desquamation, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), erythema and epidermal thickness in mouse skin, according to "Anti-photoaging effects of soy isoflavone extract (aglycone and acetylglucoside form) from soybean cake" by Huang CC, Hsu BY, Wu NL, Tsui WH, Lin TJ, Su CC, Hung CF.(9)

10. Hypolipidemic effects
In the comprison of whether Monascus-fermented soybean extracts (MFSE) enriched with bioactive mevinolins (natural statins) and aglycone isoflavones (daidzein, glycitein, and genistein) perform an additive hypolipidemic effect in hyperlipidemic ratsand unfermented soybean extracts (UFSE), which have a higher level of glucoside isoflavones (daidzin, glycitin, and genistin) without mevinolin, found that treatment with both MFSE200 and MFSE400 groups for 40 days significantly reduced the activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase by averages of 35.6 and 43.2%, respectively, as compared to the high-fat diet group (p < 0.01). The results indicate that MFSE performs a more potent hypolipidemic action via improvement of the lipid profiles and down-regulated HMG-CoA reductase activity than UFSE in hyperlipidemic rats, according to "Hypolipidemic effects of Monascus-fermented soybean extracts in rats fed a high-fat and -cholesterol diet" by Pyo YH, Seong KS.(10)

11. Metabolic and inflammatory markers
in the measurement of glucose, insulin, and adipokines/cytokines in 75 healthy postmenopausal women who were randomized to receive 20 g of soy protein with 160 mg of total isoflavones (64 mg genistein, 63 mg daidzein, and 34 mg glycitein) or 20 g of soy protein placebo for 12 weeks. Women taking estrogen discontinued therapy at least 3 months before the study, found that after 12 weeks of treatment, there were significant positive changes in tumor necrosis factor alpha levels within the placebo group (P < 0.0001) and adiponectin levels within the isoflavone group (P = 0.03). Comparison of pre-post change between the groups showed a small but significant increase in serum adiponectin levels in the isoflavone group (P = 0.03) compared with the placebo group. No significant changes were seen in any other parameter between the two groups, according to "Effects of high-dose isoflavones on metabolic and inflammatory markers in healthy postmenopausal women" by Charles C, Yuskavage J, Carlson O, John M, Tagalicud AS, Maggio M, Muller DC, Egan J, Basaria S.(11)

12. Post-menopausal effects
found that high-dose isoflavones is associated with improved QOL among women who have become menopausal recently. Hence, the timing of isoflavone supplementation with regards to the onset of menopause appears to be important. The use of isoflavones, as an alternative to estrogen therapy, may be potentially useful and seemingly safe in this group of women who are looking for relief from menopausal symptoms, according to "Effect of high-dose isoflavones on cognition, quality of life, androgens, and lipoprotein in post-menopausal women" by Basaria S, Wisniewski A, Dupree K, Bruno T, Song MY, Yao F, Ojumu A, John M, Dobs AS.(12)

13. Obesity
In the investigation of Soygerm isoflavones fermentated by Bifidobacterium breve with most of isoflavone glycosides (daidzin, glycitin and genistin) in soygerms were deglycosylated to their corresponding isoflavone aglycones (daidzein, glycitein and genistein) within 24 h fermentation, found that ral administration of fermented isoflavones effectively suppressed absorption of excessive lipid into a body. Addition of either unfermented or fermented soygerm isoflavones effectively inhibited adipocyte differentiation from 3T3-L1 in a dose dependent manner., according to "Anti-obesity activities of fermented soygerm isoflavones by Bifidobacterium breve" by Choi I, Kim Y, Park Y, Seog H, Choi H.(13)

14. Etc.

D. Quoted from Soy and Joy (Posted with Permission of the writer)
1. Low-Density-Lipoprotein (LDL)
2. Diabetes
3. Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women
4. Premenstrual syndrome
5. Heart Disease
6. Soy and Menstruation
7. Type II diabetes
8. Soy and Breast Cancer
9. Soy and prostate cancer (One for the men)
10. Soy and Atherosclerosis.
11. Soy and Endometrial Cancer
12. Soy and Liver Cancer
13. Soy and Autoimmune Diseases
14. Soy and Tuberculosis and HIV Disease
15. Soy and Sex and long-term soy diets
16. Soy and Antioxidants
17. Soy and thyroid cancer
18. Soy and Hormonal Effects
19. Soy and physiology, and implications for human health
20. Soy, Fermentation Increases the Bioavailability of Isoflavones Effects
21. Soy Treatment for Prostate Cancer (One point for the men)
22. Soy and The Adverse Effects in Patients with Prostate Cancer (One more point for men)
23. Soy and The Adverse Effects Associated with Chemotherapy
24. Soy and Bladder cancer
25. Soy and Inflammation
26. Soy and High Blood Pressure
27. Soy and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing hormone (LH)
28. Soy as Estrogen Agonists/Antagonists.
29. Soy and Lung Cancer of Non smokers
30. Soy and Kidney function In Type II diabetes
31. Soy and Fibroids
32. Soy and Weight Loss
33. Soy and Insomnia
34. Soy and Immune System
35. Soy and Cognitive Function
36. Soy and Anxiety
37. Soy and Sex Hormones in Healthy Adult Male (Less worry for men)
38. soy and Platelet Aggregation
39. Soy and Antifungal Acitivity
40. Soy and Renal Cell Carcinoma
41. Soy and Sex Hormone In Men
42. Soy and plasma sex hormones
43. Soy and Anti-Photoaging
44. Soy and Lipotoxicity in Liver
45. Soy and Menstrual Pain
46. Soy and Menstrual Symptoms
47. Soy and Muscle Protein
48. Soy and Digestive system
49. Soy and Blood Pressure in Obesity
50. Soy and Uric Acid (Hyperuricemia and Gout)
51. Soy and Bacterial Infection
52. Soy and Osteopenia
53. Soy and Depression
54. Soy and Neurobehavioral Effects
55. Soy and Endometriosis
56. Soy and Anti-Wrinkle
57. Soy and C-reactive Protein in post-menopausal women
58. Soy helps to reverse age- and scopolamine-induced memory
59. Soy and Lifestyle-Related Diseases
60. Soy and Alcoholic Liver Disease
61. Soy and Muscle Support
62. Soy and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia Coli
63. Soy and Protection of fluid losses in Escherichia coli
64. Soy and Rheumatoid Arthritis
65. Soy and Alzheimer's disease and Aging
66. Soy and Asthma
67. Soy and Back Pain
68. Soy and Bad Breath
69. Soy and Baldness
70. Soy and Urinary Incontinence
71. Soy and Neurobehavioural Actions
72. Soy and equol and O-desmethylangolensin
73. Soy and Bone Cancer
74. Soy and Climacteric Symptoms
75. Soy and Angiogenesis
76. Soy and Reproductive Organs in Infants
77. Soy and Clomiphene Citrate (Artificial Insemination)
78. Soybeans and Anovulatory cycle
79. Soy and Wound Healing
80. Soy and Thyroid Hormones
81. Soy bean as medicinal, food and and other uses
82. Soy and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
83. Soy and immunomodulatory bioactivity 84. Soy as alternative to hormone replacement therapy
85. Soy and kidney disease
86. Soy protein diet and linoleic acid
87. Soy protein and polycystic kidney disease (PKD) and elevated kidney insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels
88. Soy protein and chronic kidney disease progression
89. Soy and Fibroadenomas
90. Are Soy isoflavones safe?
91. Soy and Peanut allergy
92. Soy and Gene expression
93. Soy and Iron Deficiency Anemia
94. Soy Sauce on Anemia Prevention in Children
95. Differential effects of whole soy extract and soy isoflavones
96. Soy and uterine cancer
97. Soy and Nipple aspirate fluid
98. Soy and Muscle protein synthesis and Muscle protein accretion
99. Soy and Anabolism
100. Soy and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma cells
101. Soy and ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV3
102. Soy and Genistein-induced neuronal apoptosis
103. Soy and fibrocystic breast disease
104. Soy and Emulsion after gastrointestinal cancer
105. Soy and risk and benefits of soy products for peri- and postmenopausal women.
106. The role of isoflavones in menopausal health consensus opinion of The North American Menopause Society.
107. Soy isoflavones and cancer cells radiotherapy
108. Soy isoflavones and Colon Cancer
109. Soy isoflavones and Cancer prevention
110. Soy isoflavones and Ovariectomy on the salivary glands
111. Soy Protein and Obesity-related comorbidities
112. Soy and muscle protein synthesis and muscle protein accretion
113. Soy and Growth of pathogenic bacteria
114. Soy protein and Metabolic syndrome
115. Soy Protein and proteinuric glomerulopathies
116. Soy Protein and Kidney Function
117. Soy and Cancer Prevention
118. Soy protein and cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease
119. Soybean and Intestinal bacteria
120. Soy isoflavones and Prevention of Breast Cancer
121. soy and seaweed supplements in healthy postmenopause
122. Soy and self-reported quality of life in post-menopausal women.
123. Soy and MicroRNAs (miRNAs) in Prostate Cancer
124. Soy and Cervical cancer
125. Soy and coronary heart disease prevention
126. Soy and Inflammatory disorders
127. Soy, the second generation soy foods
128. Soy and renal cell carcinoma tumors and metastatic disease
129. Soy isoflavone and Sanfilippo Disease
130. Soy and endothelial function and blood pressure
131. Soy lecithin and Maintenance of sperm
132. Soy and Antiatherogenic and Antiperoxidative
133. Soy and Macrophage Phagocytosis and Lymphocyte
134. Soy and Anti-Epigenetic changes
135. Soy and body weight and glycemic control
136. Soy protein versus soy phytoestrogens
137. Soy Protein and Aortic cholesteryl ester content
138. Soy and Mental Stress
139. Soy and Administration on hypercholesterolemia
140. Soy and Vascular Effects
141. Soy isoflavones and lung cancer
142. Soy isoflavones and curcumin and Prostate-specific antigen.
143. Soy isoflavones and Ovarian estrogen receptor-α
144. Soy and Antiatherogenic and Antiperoxidative
145. Soy lecithin and Maintenance of sperm
146. Soy and muscle protein synthesis
147. Soy milk and the Adventist Health
148. Soy protein and body fat
149. Soy and physicochemical properties
150. Soy and menstrual migraine
151. Soy and neuropathic pain
152. Soy and symptoms of Krabbe disease
153. Soy protein diet increases skilled forelimb reaching function after stroke
154. Soy and Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS)
155. Soy and Parkinson's disease
156. Soy isoflavones and Alzheimer's disease
157. Soy isoflavones and Memory performance
158. Soy isoflavone and Cerebral arteries
159. Soy and Neurovascular research
160. Soy isoflavones and Myocardial fibrosis
161. Soy and Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC)
162. Soy and Vasomotor symptoms
163. Soy isoflavones and Prostate-specific antigen
164. Soy and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells
165. Soy and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A) activities
166. Soy and Metastatic cancer progression
167. Soy and Human hepatoma cells
168. Soy Isoflavone and Lung Cancer
169. Soy isoflavones and the production of prostate-specific antigen
170. Soy isoflavones (Glyceollins ) and adipocyte activity and nutrient metabolism
171. Soybean glyceollins and potential cancer-protective antiestrogenic effects
172. Soy isoflavonoid and endogenous estrogen metabolism
173. Soy protein and hormones in pre- and post-menopausal women
174. Soybean isoflavone and feminizing effects in Men
175. Soy protein or isoflavones on reproductive hormones in men
176. Isoflavone-rich soy protein and androgen receptor
177. Hormonal effects of soy and premenopausal women and men
178. Isoflavone-free soy diet and ovarian hormones in premenopausal women 
179. Soy and Menstrual Migraine
180. Soy and cerebral and myocardial infarctions
181. Soy and Neuroprotective effects
182. Soy and Memory performance
183. Soy and Cerebral vascular disease
185. Soy and Multiple Sclerosis
186. Soy and chronic diseases
187. Soy milk as probiotics
188. Soy milk and Infantile Colic
189. Soy and gender-role play behavior in children
190. Soy protein and Congestive heart failure
191. Soy isoflavones and cardioprotection to offspring
192. Soy and Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)
193. Soy and Angina
194. Soy isoflavones and exercise to improve physical capacity
 195. Solecithin phosphatidic acid and Stress Disorders
196. Soy and Peanut allergy
197. Soy and Longevity, Learning and Memory
198. Soy lecithin administration on hypercholesterolemia
199. Soy lecithin replaces egg yolk for cryopreservation of human sperm
200. Soy protein and Antiatherogenic and Antiperoxidative effects 
201.Soybean oil and fatty liver and serum cholesterol
202. Soybean oil on atherogenic metabolic risks associated with estrogen deficiency
203. Soy and Short-term use of parenteral nutrition
204. Stearidonic Acid-Enhanced Soybean Oil
205. Soy and Dietary lipids during early pregnancy
206. Nutrition professionals. and Participants' willingness to consume soy foods
207.  Reported attitudes and beliefs toward soy food consumption
208. Soy protein and its implication in diseases mediated by lipid disorders
209. Patients' perceptions of cholesterol, cardiovascular disease risk, and risk communication strategies
210. Soy and the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases
211. Reported attitudes and beliefs toward soy food consumption
212.Soy protein and its implication in diseases mediated by lipid disorders
213. Soy Isoflavones-Role of intestinal bacteria as the "second human genome"
214. Age-stratified serum levels of isoflavones and proportion of equol
215. soy isoflavone metabolism and accumulation in prostatic fluid
216. Soy and potential health benefits of phytoestrogens
217. Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle
218. Soy and leukemia
219. Isoflavone-free soy diet on ovarian hormones in premenopausal women
220. Fat, dietary fiber, soy isoflavones, and alcohol with levels of sex hormones and prolactin in premenopausal Japanese women
221. Isoflavone-free soy diet on ovarian hormones in premenopausal women
222. Effects of isoflavones on breast density in pre- and post-menopausal women
223. Factors to consider in the association between soy isoflavone intake and breast cancer risk
224. Effect of dietary soy intake on breast cancer risk
225. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants
226. Soy milk as effective as skim milk
227. A novel soy-based meal replacement formula for weight loss among obese individuals
228. Effect of soy drink replacement in a weight reducing diet
229. Soy isoflavones protect the skin from oxidative stress induced by UVB
230. Soy and estrogenicity or antiestrogenicity
231. soy isoflavone aglycone improves the aged skin of adult women
232. Soy isoflavones on the skin of postmenopausal women
233. Oxidative in vitro metabolism of the soy phytoestrogens
234. Soybean isoflavones and Chronic health disorders
235. Oxidative metabolism and genotoxic potential of major isoflavone phytoestrogens
236. Daidzein and genistein glucuronides are weakly estrogenic and activate human natural killer cells
237. The Health Benefits Of Tofu Food
238. Inhibition of murine bladder tumorigenesis by soy isoflavones
239. Self-identities and BMI of Minnesotan soy consumers and non-consumers
240. The attitudes and beliefs of soy foods consumers (SCs) versus nonconsumers (NCs)
241. For me the taste of soy is not a barrier to its consumption
242. Infant formulas and soy protein-based formulas
243. Isoflavone content of infant formulas and the metabolic Fate
244. Developmental Status of 1-Year-Old Infants Fed Breast Milk, Cow's Milk Formula, or Soy Formula
245. Probiotics in infants for prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity
246. Early-life soy exposure and age at menarche
247. Full of Beans? Early Soy Exposure Associated with Less Feminine Play in Girls
248. Soy formula for prevention of allergy and food intolerance in infants
249. Diagnostic approach and management of cow's milk protein allergy in infants and children
250. Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle of premenopausal women
251. Effects of an isoflavone-free soy diet on ovarian hormones in premenopausal women
252. Associations of intakes of fat, dietary fiber, soy isoflavones, and alcohol with levels of sex hormones
253. Legume, soy, tofu, and isoflavone intake and endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women 
254. Tamoxifen, soy, and lifestyle factors in Asian American women with breast cancer
255. Soy isoflavone daidzein and Skin Cancer
256. Soy Estrogen - 5 Easy Ways to Get This Natural Estrogen Replacement
257. Validation of a soy food-frequency questionnaire and evaluation of correlates of plasma isoflavone concentrations
258. Soymilk For Health - Top 10 Benefits!
259. Retinoid-induced epidermal hyperplasia in human skin organ culture: inhibition with soy extract and soy isoflavones
260. Herbal antiinflammatory drugs in the treatment of painful osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain
261. Pharmaceutical and nutraceutical management of canine osteoarthritis
262. Symptomatic efficacy of avocado-soybean unsaponifiables (ASU) in osteoarthritis (OA)
263. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiable mixtures on metalloproteinases, cytokines and prostaglandin E2 production
264. Avocado/soybean unsaponifiables in the treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis
265. Quality, antioxidative ability, and cell proliferation-enhancing activity
266. Enhanced antioxidative activity of soybean koji
267. Soy isoflavones and plasma lipids in normocholesterolemic and mildly hypercholesterolemic
268. Soy protein in the management of hyperlipidemia
269. Equol status and blood lipid profile and Soy products
270. Soy protein and antibiotic release, bacterial inhibition and cellular response
271. Novel soy protein wound dressings with controlled antibiotic release
272. Soy isoflavone equol and Acute colitis
273. Soy isoflavones and exercise to improve physical capacity
274. Weight loss without losing muscle mass
275. Soy and hormonal action and brain plasticity
276. Soy and Neurobehavioral effects
277. Soy isoflavones on estrogen and phytoestrogen metabolism
278. Soy consumption alters endogenous estrogen metabolism
279. Soy and the exercise-induced inflammatory response
280. Antihyperglycemic effect of biochanin A, a soy isoflavone
281. Soy and bone mineral density (BMD) in women aged 30-40
282. Lignans and isoflavones and breast cancer risk
283. Soy and breast density
284. Soy Milk Consumption and serum d-dimer
285. Effect of probiotic-fermented, genetically modified soy milk on hypercholesterolemia
286. Effect of bioactive compounds in lactobacilli-fermented soy skim milk on femoral bone microstructure
287. Neurobehavioral actions of coumestrol and related isoflavonoids
288. Phytoestrogens modulate binding response of estrogen receptors alpha and beta
289. Soy isoflavone genistein and tendon collagen
290. Dietary polyphenols and mechanisms of osteoarthritis
291. Comparison of the effects of cows' milk, fortified soy milk, and calcium supplement on weight and fat loss in premenopausal overweight and obese women.  
292. Green tea and dietary soy and Cancers
293. Soy and high calcium and Bone mineral density
294. Isoflavones with supplemental calcium and isoflavones alone. in Bone loss
295. Isoflavone-enriched milk and Bone Mass
296. Soy oil and Steady weight Loss
297. Soy isoflavones and antioxidants and Krabbe disease
298. High polyphenol, low probiotic diet for weight loss
299. Relation between equol and soy foods health effect
300. Gut bacterial metabolism of the soy isoflavone daidzein
301. Metabolism of dietary soy isoflavones to equol by human intestinal microflora
302. Equol status in the effects of isoflavone on bone and fat mass
303. Soy isoflavones, diet and physical exercise modify serum cytokines in healthy obese
304. Soy isoflavones improve insulin sensitivity without changing serum leptin
305. Soy and Energy metabolism
306. High-protein, low-glycemic-load hypocaloric diet in overweight and obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome
307. Soy protein and Metabolic syndrome (MetS)
308. Does consuming isoflavones reduce or increase breast cancer risk?
309. Isoflavones and cognitive function in older women
310. Soy and red clover for mid-life and aging
311. Soy isoflavone supplementation and body weight and glucose metabolism 
312. Soy and mammographic density
313. Soy isoflavones and Breast cancer and puberty timing
314. The optimal soy protein and isoflavone intakes for women
315. Soy nut consumption and decreased menopausal symptoms
316. Botanical and dietary supplements for menopausal symptoms
317. Soy and red clover for mid-life and aging
318. Soy milk and isoflavone supplements on cognitive performance in healthy, postmenopausal women 


E. Quoted From Foods to prevent and treat diseases
1. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)
Intake of soy protein can enhance the protective effect against Rheumatoid Arthritis. In the study to evaluate preventive and therapeutic effects of soy protein on collagen-induced arthritis rats, showed that Administration of soy protein significantly suppressed the progression of collagen II-induced arthritis and inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin6, leptin, and adiponectin. Soy protein appeared to be a potent immunomodulatory inhibitor of collagen II-induced arthritis in rats
(1).

2. Polymalagia Arthritis(PMR)
In the study to examine the role of TK activity on the expression of the inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), found that TK inhibition by genistein had no effect on the expression or nuclear translocation of the transcription factors interferon regulatory factor-1 and nuclear factor-KB, respectively, both of which have been implicated in transcriptional regulation of the human iNOS gene. Nuclear run-on analysis demonstrated that the effect of genistein on iNOS messenger RNA expression was not at the level of transcription, suggesting that posttranscriptional regulation of iNOS messenger RNA might be TK dependent. Isoflavones, such as genistein, are useful tools to dissect regulatory pathways in vitro and in vivo and may have potential use as novel antiinflammatory therapeutic agents(2).

3. Ischemic heart disease
Soy sauce is a seasoning produced by fermenting soybeans and filamentous fungus, along with water and salt after a period of sometime, it yields a moromi or thick mash of cereal to obtain soy sauce by pressing it to liquid form. Tamari is made by collecting the liquid which was pressed and the liquid drained drains from miso after a certain time of fermentation. 
a. Cardiovascular health
In the investigation of dietary proteins and their effect in heart diseases found that a direct cholesterol lowering effect of proteins has not been shown. Despite earlier research indicating that soy protein has cardioprotective effects as compared to other proteins, these observations have not been confirmed by randomized placebo-controlled trials. However, most experts recommend the consumption of foods rich in plant proteins as alternatives to meat and dairy products rich in saturated fat and containing cholesterol, according to "Dietary proteins and atherosclerosis" by Darioli R.(3)
b.  Hypolipidemic effect
In the observation of Soy sauce (Shoyu), a traditional Japanese fermented seasoning and its effect on cholesterol level found that in a 4-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel group study, hyperlipidemic men (TG >150 mg/dl) were treated with 600 mg of SPS (n=15) or placebo (n=15) daily. After 4 weeks, serum TG levels in the SPS-treated group were significantly (P<0.05) lower than the baseline (0 week). In conclusion, SPS of soy sauce reduce lipid absorption, and soy sauce is a potentially promising seasoning for the treatment of hyperlipidemia through food, according to "Hypolipidemic effect of Shoyu polysaccharides from soy sauce in animals and humans" by Kobayashi M, Magishi N, Matsushita H, Hashimoto T, Fujimoto M, Suzuki M, Tsuji K, Saito M, Inoue E, Yoshikawa Y, Matsuura T.(3a).

4. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH)
In the study to determine  the effects of genistein, a major component of soy, on growth of human-patient benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and prostate cancer tissue in three-dimensional collagen gel-supported histoculture, showed that Genistein in doses of 1.25-10 micrograms/ml decreased the growth of BPH tissue in histoculture in a dose-dependent manner, with little additional effect at higher doses. Prostate cancer tissue in histoculture was similarly inhibited by these doses of genistein(4).

5. Cough
Im the study to analyze the relation between dietary intake at baseline and new onset of cough with phlegm in a population-based cohort of 63,257 middle-aged Chinese men and women initiated in Singapore between 1993 and 1998, found that a diet high in fiber from fruit and, possibly, soyfoods may reduce the incidence of chronic respiratory symptoms. Associated nutrients, such as flavonoids, may contribute to this association(5).

6. Endometriosis
In the study to examine the associations among soy isoflavone intake, estrogen receptor 2 (ESR2) gene polymorphisms and risk of endometriosis, showed that Higher levels of urinary genistein and daidzein were associated with decreased risk of advanced endometriosis (P for trend = 0.01 and 0.06, respectively) but not early endometriosis. For advanced endometriosis, the adjusted odds ratio for the highest quartile group was 0.21 (95% confidence interval = 0.06-0.76) for genistein and 0.29 (0.08-1.03) for daidzein, when compared with the lowest group. Inverse associations were also noted between urinary isoflavones and the severity of endometriosis (P for trend = 0.01 for genistein and 0.07 for daidzein). For advanced endometriosis, ESR2 gene RsaI polymorphism appeared to modify the effects of genistein (P for interaction = 0.03)(6).

7. Fibroids
Genistein is a soy-derived phytoestrogen. In the study to  investigated the significant inhibitory effect of genistein on estradiol (E(2))-induced leiomyoma cells proliferation, indicated that PPARgamma was expressed in ELT-3 cells and genistein acted as PPARgamma ligand. This inhibitory effect of genistein was attenuated by the treatment of cells with PPARgamma antagonist bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) or GW9662 and suggested that the repressive effect of genistein on E(2)-induced ELT-3 cell proliferation is through the activation of PPARgamma. Genistein may be useful as an alternative therapy for leiomyoma(7).

8. Fibromyalgia
Some researchers suggested that Shakes that contain soy and shakes that contain casein, when combined with a multidisciplinary fibromyalgia treatment program, provide a decrease in fibromyalgia symptoms. Separation between the effects of soy and casein (control) shakes did not favor the intervention. Therefore, large-sample studies using soy for patients with fibromyalgia are probably not indicated(8).

9. Graves' disease
In the study to investigate the effect of quercetin in primary cultured orbital fibroblasts from GO, targeting pathways of inflammation, aberrant accumulation of extracellular matrix macromolecules, and adipose tissue expansion. showed that Treatment with noncytotoxic doses of quercetin inhibited accumulation of intracytoplasmic lipid droplets and resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) α, and C/EBPβ proteins. In conclusion, inhibition of inflammation, hyaluronan production, and adipogenesis by the natural plant product quercetin in vitro provides the basis for further study of its potential use in the treatment of GO(9).

10. Hepatitis
Quercetin, a ubiquitous plant flavonoid, has been identified to inhibit NS3 activity in a specific dose-dependent manner in an in vitro catalysis assay, showed that quercetin has a direct inhibitory effect on the HCV NS3 protease. These results point to the potential of quercetin as a natural nontoxic anti-HCV agent reducing viral production by inhibiting both NS3 and heat shock proteins essential for HCV replication(10).

11. Choltesterol
In the study to investigate the anti-hyperlipidemic effect of soy bean extract solution fermented by Bacillus subtilis MORI (BTD-1E) in obese db/db mice, showed that Eight-week-old male db/db mice were administered 33.3 mg/kg BTD-1E solution orally once a day for four weeks. The BTD-1E group showed significantly lower body weight compared with the db control group (P<0.05). The BTD-1E group showed significantly lower serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels compared with the db control group, respectively (P<0.05, P<0.01). The BTD-1E group showed significantly decreased liver weight relative to final body weight compared with the db control group (P<0.01). After four weeks of BTD-1E administration, lipid droplets in the liver were apparently decreased in the BTD-1E group compared to the db control group. In summary, our results suggest that BTD-1E has an anti-hyperlipidemic effect in the obese mouse model(11).

12. HPV (human papilloma virus)
According to the study of the potential immunomodulatory effects of genistein on the immune system and against TC-1 tumor cell line were evaluated in adult female C57BL/6 mice, Dr. Ghaemi A, and the research team at the Golestan University of Medical Sciences indicated that the effect of GEN on tumor growth may be attributed to its effect on lymphocyte proliferation, cytolytic activity and IFN-γ production.  GEN exerts an immunomodulatory effect in a mouse model of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) associated-cervical cancer(12).

13. Hypertension
in the study to evaluate the antihypertensive potential of soy milk (500 mL twice daily) compared with cow's milk was investigated in a 3-mo double-blind randomized study of 40 men and women with mild-to-moderate hypertension, found that , chronic soy milk consumption had modest, but significant hypotensive action in essential hypertensive subjects. This hypotensive action was correlated with the urinary excretion of the isoflavonoid genistein(13).

14. Irritable bowel syndrome
In the study to evaluate (i) the effects of a phytoestrogen-rich soy germ fermented ingredient (SG) on visceral hypersensitivity, hyperpermeability and other symptoms in stressed intact female rats, (ii) the mechanisms of action involved on the basis of both estrogenic and protease inhibitor activities of SG, researchers showed that A 2-wk oral treatment with SG prevented the stress-induced hyperpermeability and visceral hypersensitivity in cyclic rats through ER activation, and blocked the increase in colonic proteolytic activity, suggesting that SG can be promising in IBS management(14).

15. Lactose intolerance
Modern soy formulas meet all nutritional requirements and safety standards of the Infant Formula Act of 1980. They are commonly used in infants with immunoglobulin E-mediated cow's milk allergy (at least 86% effective), lactose intolerance, galactosemia, and as a vegetarian human milk substitute. Largely as a result of research in animal models, concerns have been voiced regarding isoflavones in soy infant formulas in relation to nutritional adequacy, sexual development, neurobehavioral development, immune function, and thyroid disease, according to the study of Safety of soy-based infant formulas containing isoflavones: the clinical evidence(15).

16. Liver disease
In the stdu8y to evaluate the protective role of soy against CCl(4)-induced liver damage in rats as four experimental groups were treated for 8 weeks and included the control group,showed that Supplementation with soy succeeded to restore the elevation of liver enzymes activities and improved serum biochemical parameters. Moreover, soy supplementation improved the antioxidant enzymes, decreased lipid peroxidation, and improved the histological picture of the liver tissue. It could be concluded that soy-protein-enriched isoflavones may be a promising agent against liver diseases(16).

17. Multiple sclerosis
In the study to investigate the use of genistein for the treatment of the murine model of MS showed that genistein treatment ameliorated significantly the clinical symptoms, modulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, we analyzed the leukocyte rolling and adherence in the CNS by performing intravital microscopy. Genistein treatment resulted in decreased rolling and adhering of leukocytes as compared to the untreated group(17).

18. Obesity
In the study of Role of dietary soy protein in obesity, researchers at the George Washington University Medical Center, indicated that there were an increasing body of literature suggests that soy protein and its isoflavones may have a beneficial role in obesity. Several nutritional intervention studies in animals and humans indicate that consumption of soy protein reduces body weight and fat mass in addition to lowering plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. In animal models of obesity, soy protein ingestion limits or reduces body fat accumulation and improves insulin resistance, the hallmark of human obesity. In obese humans, dietary soy protein also reduces body weight and body fat mass in addition to reducing plasma lipids(18).

19. Osteoporosis
In the study to clarify the effect of ingesting soy isoflavone extracts (not soy protein or foods containing isoflavones) on bone mineral density (BMD) in menopausal women, found that  the varying effects of isoflavones on spine BMD across trials might be associated with study characteristics of intervention duration (6 vs. 12 months), region of participant (Asian vs. Western), and basal BMD (normal bone mass vs. osteopenia or osteoporosis). No significant effects on femoral neck, hip total, and trochanter BMD were found. Soy isoflavone extract supplements increased lumbar spine BMD in menopausal women(19).

20. Parkinson's disease
In the study of the protective effect of the bioflavonoid quercetin on behaviors, antioxidases, and neurotransmitters in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine-(MPTP-) induced Parkinson's disease (PD, show that quercetin treatment markedly improves the motor balance and coordination of MPTP-treated mice. Significant increases were observed in the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, AchE, the content of dopamine (DA) in the quercetin plus MPTP groups compared to those in the MPTP group. Significant reduction the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) immunoreactivity in striatum of brains was observed in the quercetin plus MPTP groups in comparison to the MPTP group. Taken together, we propose that quercetin has shown antiparkinsonian properties in our studies. More work is needed to explore detailed mechanisms of action(20)

21. Pelvic inflammatory disease
In the study of Changes in the anti-inflammatory activity of soy isoflavonoidgenistein versus genistein incorporated in two types of cyclodextrin derivatives, found that genistein is an active anti-inflammatory phytocompound andits complexation with hydrophilic beta-cyclodextrin derivatives leads to a stronger antiinflammatoryactivity(21).

22. Premenstrual syndrome
In the study to identify the potential relationship between soy isoflavones and premenstrual syndrome, showed that after two cycles of ISP containing IF intervention, total symptoms (F(2,36) 8.20, P=0.000) and physical symptoms (F(2,36) 8.18, P=0.000) were significantly reduced compared with baseline after both active and placebo treatments, although differences between active and placebo treatment were non-significant. Specific premenstrual symptoms, headache (F(2,32) 4.10, P=0.026) and breast tenderness (F(2,32) 4.59, P=0.018), were reduced from baseline after soy IF, but not milk protein placebo. Cramps (F(2,32) 4.15, P=0.025) and swelling (F(2,32) 4.64, P=0.017) were significantly lower after active treatment compared with placebo. Concentrations of genistein and daidzein were increased following soy IF consumption, but equol production did not enhance symptom reduction(22).

23. Thyroid disorders
In the study to evaluate the relevant literature and provide the clinician guidance for advising their patients about the effects of soy on thyroid function, showed that soy foods, by inhibiting absorption, may increase the dose of thyroid hormone required by hypothyroid patients. However, hypothyroid adults need not avoid soy foods. In addition, there remains a theoretical concern based on in vitro and animal data that in individuals with compromised thyroid function and/or whose iodine intake is marginal soy foods may increase risk of developing clinical hypothyroidism(23). Others suggested that Seaweed ingestion increased I/C concentrations (P < .0001) and serum TSH (P < .0001) (1.69 +/- 0.22 vs. 2.19 +/- 0.22 microU/mL, mean +/- SE). Soy supplementation did not affect thyroid end points. Seven weeks of 5 g/day seaweed supplementation was associated with a small but statistically significant increase in TSH. Soy protein isolate supplementation was not associated with changes in serum thyroid hormone concentrations(23a).

24. Etc.

F. Quoted Frpm Foods to prevent and treat cancers 
1. Bladder cancer
Soy phytochemicals have been associated with the protective effect against bladder cancer as it contains genistein, and the isoflavone-rich soy phytochemical concentrate (SPC). Dr. Singh AV and the research team at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, showed that Mice treated with genistin and SPC had reduced final tumor weights by 56% (P < 0.05) and 52% (P < 0.05), respectively, associated with induction of tumor cell apoptosis and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in vivo. In addition, SPC treatment, but not genistin treatment, significantly inhibited lung metastases by 95% (P < 0.01) associated with significant down-regulation of NF-kappaB expression in tumor tissues and reduction of circulating insulin-like growth factor-I levels, suggesting that SPC may contain other bioactive ingredients that have antimetastatic activity(1). 

2. Cervical cancer
Epidemiological and preclinical evidence suggests that polyphenolic phytochemicals exemplified by epigallocatechin gallate from tea, curcumin from curry and soya isoflavones possess cancer chemopreventive properties. Dr. Thomasset SC and scientists at the University of Leicester, in the review of above showed that the available evidence for tea polyphenols tentatively supports their advancement into phase III clinical intervention trials aimed at the prevention of progression of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia, leukoplakia or premalignant cervical disease. In the case of curcumin and soya isoflavones more studies in premalignacies seem appropriate to optimise the nature and design of suitable phase III trials. The abundance of flavonoids and related polyphenols in the plant kingdom makes it possible that several hitherto uncharacterised agents with chemopreventive efficacy are still to be identified, which may constitute attractive alternatives to currently used chemopreventive drugs(2).

3. Breast cancer  
In a study of " Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich in isoflavones on the menstrual cycle of premenopausal women" , by A Cassidy, S Bingham and KD Setchell (Source from Dunn Clinical Nutrition Centre, Cambridge, UK. ) posted in The Americal Journal Clinical Nutrition, researchers indicated that these effects are presumed to be due to nonsteroidal estrogens of the isoflavone class, which behave as partial estrogen agonists/antagonists. The responses to soy protein are potentially beneficial with respect to risk factors for breast cancer and may in part explain the low incidence of breast cancer and its correlation with a high soy intake in Japanese and Chinese women(4). Other suggested  high dietary levels of soy isoflavones do not stimulate breast or uterine proliferation in postmenopausal monkeys and may contribute to an estrogen profile associated with reduced breast cancer risk(6). One study indicated that Soy isoflavone genistein induces cell death in breast cancer cells through mobilization of endogenous copper ions and generation of reactive oxygen species(3)

4. Endomatrial Cancer
In the study to investigate the interactive effect of polymorphisms in the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) gene with soy isoflavones, tea consumption, and dietary fiber on endometrial cancer risk in a population-based, case-control study of 1,199 endometrial cancer patients and 1,212 controls, found that the Asp(327)Asn (rs6259) polymorphism was associated with decreased risk of endometrial cancer, particularly among postmenopausal women (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.62-1.00). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) modified associations of soy isoflavones and tea consumption but not fiber intake with endometrial cancer, with the inverse association of soy intake and tea consumption being more evident for those with the Asp/Asp genotype of the SHBG gene at Asp(327)Asn (rs6259), particularly premenopausal women (P(interaction) = 0.06 and 0.02, respectively, for soy isoflavones and tea intake)(4). Other researchers suggested that a reduced risk of endometrial cancer was associated with total isoflavone intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥7.82 vs <1.59 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.91), daidzein intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥3.54 vs <0.70 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.46 to 0.90), and genistein intake (highest vs lowest quintile, ≥3.40 vs <0.69 mg per 1000 kcal/d, RR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.91). No statistically significant association with endometrial cancer risk was observed for increasing intake of legumes, soy, tofu, or glycitein. Truncated age-adjusted incidence rates of endometrial cancer for the highest vs lowest quintile of total isoflavone intake were 55 vs 107 per 100 000 women per year, respectively. The partial population attributable risk percent for total isoflavone intake lower than the highest quintile was 26.7% (95% CI = 5.3% to 45.8%)(4a).


5. Thyroid cancer
In the study to observe that an acidic methanolic extract of soybeans contains compounds that inhibit thyroid peroxidase-(TPO) catalyzed reactions essential to thyroid hormone synthesis, showed that In the presence of iodide ion, genistein and daidzein blocked TPO-catalyzed tyrosine iodination by acting as alternate substrates, yielding mono-, di-, and triiodoisoflavones. Genistein also inhibited thyroxine synthesis using iodinated casein or human goiter thyroglobulin as substrates for the coupling reaction(5).

6. Stomach Cancer/Gastric Cancer
Genistein is a phytochemical in the Isoflavones, belonging to the group of Flavonoids (polyphenols), found abundantly in food of the family of legumes, soy, etc. In the study to determinewhether the effect of genistein is mediated via suppression of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 protein, and elucidated the mechanism of action of this effect in the human gastric cancer cell line BGC-823, showed that Genistein treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner; Western blotting analysis indicated a significant dose-dependent decrease in COX-2 protein levels. Genistein treatment exerted a significant inhibitory effect on activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Additionally, the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate caused a reduction in COX-2 protein levels and NF-κB activation, similar to the effect of genistein(6).

7. Melanoma skin cancer
Gallic acid (GA) is a phytochemical in the class of Phenolic acids, found abundantly in tea, mango, strawberries, soy, etc. In the study to examine the influence of GA on the protein levels and gene expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in-vitro migration and invasiveness of human melanoma cells, showed that GA has antimetastatic potential by decreasing invasiveness of cancer cells. Moreover, this action of GA was involved in the Ras, p-ERK signaling pathways resulting in inhibition of MMP-2 in A375.S2 human melanoma cells. These data, therefore, provide evidence for the role of GA as a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent, which can markedly inhibit the invasive capacity of melanoma cells(7).

8. Etc.

References
A. Quoted From the world most healthy foods
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(a) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18522411
(b) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18608549
(c) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Effect%20of%20Germinated%20Soybean%20Protein%20Hydrolysates%20on%20Adipogenesis%20and%20Adipolysis%20in%203T3-L1%20Cells
(d) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20302378
(e) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22005499

(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21285035
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19925721
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539268
(4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12870295
(5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22072339
(6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16418439
(7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20335543

Tofu
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(a) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15808899
(b) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22011856
(c) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22001128
(d) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22079530
(f) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19484707

(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539268
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22072339
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22111015
(4) http://www.millipore.com/references/tech1/7yv3hk

Sources
Soy sauce
(a) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22139566
(b) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19240374
(c) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15492861
(d) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Shoyu%20and%20breast%20cancer
(e) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813866

(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19539268


B. Quote From the world moat healthy herbs
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(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18522411
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18608549
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Effect%20of%20Germinated%20Soybean%20Protein%20Hydrolysates%20on%20Adipogenesis%20and%20Adipolysis%20in%203T3-L1%20Cells
(4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20302378
(5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22005499

C. Quoted From Phytochemicals in Foods 
Daidzein  
Sources
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22279937
(6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22158125
(7) http://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/12/9/5616/
(8) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21992596
(9) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21913999
(10) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21745415

(11) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21736835

Genistein
Sources
(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22293631
(2) http://centaur.reading.ac.uk/20335/
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22292769
(4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20673057
(5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21736835
(6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14628433
(7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21958026
(8) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20362658
(9) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20484465
(10) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22120966
(11) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22230815
 
Glycitein
Sources
(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19373613
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22158125
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21943063
(4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21861721
(5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21503668
(6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21161820
(7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20714813
(8) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20714292
(9) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21614173
(10) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19697921
(11) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18981951
(12) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19411814
(13) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17673827

D. Quoted from Soy and Joy (Posted with Permission of the writer)


E. Quoted From Foods to prevent and treat diseases
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(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21681567
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19281374
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22139566
(3a) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813866
(4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9465938
(5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15117740
(6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17474167
(7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19903033
(8) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18990724
(9) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22039452
(10) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22239530
(11) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22787486
(12) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=soy%20and%20Hpv
(13) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12097666 
(14) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22727545
(15) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15113975
(16) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22530140
(17) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18602076 
(18) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17396158
(19) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20199985 
(20) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22454690
(21) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22716299 
(22) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15975174
(23) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16571087
(23a) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17472472 


F. Quoted From Foods to prevent and treat cancers
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(1) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16452247 
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17131309 
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21462322
(4) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19005973 
(4a) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22158125 
(5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9464451  
(6) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22289529 
(7) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21734530    

1 comment:

  1. Nice Posting! Keep it up!!Main Problems Faced by Women Trying to Conceive.First you must determine the length of your menstrual cycle from ovulation calendar, which commences on the first day of bleeding or spotting and ends on the day before your next period starts.

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